Riff on a wrap

My most recent wrap dress was pretty traditional- but my second wrap project has some cool and new elements:  notably the d- ring closure and the super straight silhouette.  This is the Utu skirt from Named pattern’s Breaking the Pattern. I have been steadily working my way through this gem of a book.

IMG_0156 (1).jpg

Wrap skirts - maybe even more than the wrap dress- are a crowd-pleasing wardrobe element. I have owned several- and they were also the run-away FAVORITE beginner sewing project when I was a student. When I went to middle school, female students were REQUIRED to take a sewing class and many chose to make a wrap skirt-remember: no zips and no buttons- but none were as cool and stylish as the Utu.

IMG_0146.jpg

I love the look of this quick and easy to make skirt. Be forewarned- you will need to curb your gymnastic moves as there isn’t a lot of fabric overlap on this wrap.  This skirt looks fabulous when standing at attention- or practicing your mountain pose (Namaste), but pay attention when bending or leaping.

I used Robert Kaufman Jetsetter twill- which has a little stretch and great recovery- from Fabric.com

The skirt is high waisted which is adorable on the pattern model- but I am long waisted- and short on the leg front.  So I modified the waistline by adjusting the darts. 

IMG_0195.jpg

I had this blue and white stripe in my stash- of unknown origins and unknown – or long forgotten -fiber content. One thing is clear- it is not cotton and it is fairly stiff. The fabric properties didn’t exactly match my idea for the top- but the color was a perfect match for this blue skirt- so I improvised…the sleeves may need modification.

IMG_0196.jpg
IMG_0153 (1).jpg

By the Book- Solina dress

This project was by the book.  Literally.  The Solina dress pattern is from the book Breaking the Pattern by sisters Saara and Laura Huhta who are also the founders of the Finnish indie pattern company Named.

IMG_7033.jpg

I was immediately drawn to this striking book when I saw the elegant, streamlined and modern patterns and beautiful styling.  The deal was sealed once I calculated it was actually cost effective to purchase this book- because there were several patterns I knew I would make.  The book offers 10 patterns, but there are 20 variations included.  For example, the Solina style can be made as a dress or a jumpsuit or top.  The book also provides tips and suggestions for numerous options for customization- so you can easily create a one of a kind garment. A dream for those of us who routinely fiddle with patterns.

IMG_3076.JPG

The templates for all the patterns are included as pattern sheets in the book.  PLUS- if you purchase the book, you receive a code to download PDF patterns to your home printer if you prefer to do that.  Originally, I thought I would download the patterns, because I download and assemble patterns frequently these days (albeit grudgingly- because while it may be old school of me- I prefer printed pattern pieces) But in the end, I decided to go the pattern tracing route. 

Surprisingly- this pattern tracing option is starting to grow on me. I think of myself as a somewhat intuitive sewist, and I find there is something in the act of tracing the pattern that transcribes it into your brain, and it kind of gives you a head start on construction because you really feel the pattern by drawing it out. It’s similar to studies that demonstrate people learn better when they write the words out longhand on paper. Anyway- the short story is- I am growing fond of tracing the pattern on Swedish tracing paper with my colored pencils

IMG_6988.jpg

Saara and Laura explain that Solina means “babble of water.” This influenced my fabric choice which is a lovely rayon crepe from The Fabric Store.  The print is a lot like the moody river with its grey and blue palette.  The Solina dress is quick and easy.  I made it even quicker by shortening the sleeves and eliminating the sleeve ties.  The other change I made was to sew the front skirt seam closed.

IMG_7023.jpg

I goofed on measuring the length and would prefer a longer dress- will have to pay attention next time.  I am pretty ok with the swishy aspect of the dress, but if I make this again, I would use a slightly heavier fabric that has a bit more body. 

IMG_7015.jpg